Mangú With Pescatarian Tres Golpes – Dominican Plantain Dish

Tres golpes without meat…hmm

When you think of tres golpes, meatless is not the first thing that comes to mind, right!? However as delicious as a tres golpes is with meat, it is easily as delicious without it too!! I promise!

What is tres golpes? Well, it’s one of the most popular and iconic dishes of the Dominican Republic. Tres golpes literally translates to three hits. However, what it really means is mangú served with salami, eggs, and fried cheese.  Unlike a traditional recipe, this recipe is pescatarian! So no meat! Tres golpes is the ultimate breakfast of champions that is also suitable for  lunch, and dinner.

 

What is mangu, must be your next question?

Mangú is boiled plantains that are then mashed. Many countries including Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Cuba also have their own versions of this dish. It’s also very similar to “fufu” a West African dish made of boiled plantains or other root vegetables, then mashed. 

There’s a silly myth that states that the name mangú came from American soldiers back in 1916 when they invaded The Dominican Republic. When the soldiers tried the dish they said “man good” to the locals and supposedly that’s how mangú was born… I, unfortunately, can’t align with this myth and believe this story has no truth in it.

Instead what makes more sense is that mangú derived from the word “mangusi” which means mashed root vegetable, in some regions of the Congo. The Dominican Republic has HUGE African influences mostly explained through the slave trade. This dish is just one of many.

 

manu eith pescatartian tres golpes

 

 

 

camarones al ajillo

Check out my camarones al ajillo recipe to make these prawns

How did i make it healthier?

As usual, let’s be honest tres golpes isn’t exactly healthy. It’s filling and yes it’s packed with nutrients and fiber because of the plantains. But let’s remember we are frying the sides, and using plenty of butter. 

However, replacing the salami with Camarones al ajillo is a step in a healthier direction. Using quality plant-based butter and milk also contributes! You still get the full satisfaction and expectation of tres golpes minus the meat!

mangu with pescatarian tres golpes

Some Mangú tips
  • Mash the plantains to your liking. I prefer mine smooth, but with a few lumps. Everyone has their own preference.
  • Remember Mangú will harden as it cools. I tend to add just a tad more liquid than what it seems it should have to help with the hardening. 
  • I also prefer to mash some of the vinegar onions into the mangú. This is a personal preference. I find that it gives the mangú extra flavor. However, feel free to add the onions on top if that’s what you prefer. 
  • When re-heating Mangú do so in a saucepan or the microwave. Add a bit of water, about 1 TBSP or so to soften it if needed. 

Check out these Dominican classics

Arroz y habichulelas con coco – coconut rice and beans

Ensalada de papa – Dominican potato salad

Vegan chicharrón de Pollo – Dominican fried chicken

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Mangú

Mangú with pescatarian tres golpes - Dominican plantain staple dish

hispanic-ish
A classic traditional Dominican dish made from mashed plantains and served with all the fix-ins! Unlike a traditional tres golpes, this recipe is pescatarian! It's also suitable for breakfast, lunch, and dinner!
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 35 mins
Course Breakfast, dinner, lunch, Main Course, Snack
Cuisine caribbean, dominican, Latin
Servings 4 People

Equipment

  • pot
  • Frying pan

Ingredients
  

Mangu

  • 5 Green plantains
  • 3 TBSP Vegan butter
  • 5 TBSP Oat milk
  • 3 TBSP Left-over water from boiled plantains

The sides/ Fix-ins

  • 300 GRAMS Camarones al ajillo (see notes for recipe)
  • 2 PACKS Halloumi (225g each)
  • 3 MEDIUM Red onions
  • 4 Eggs
  • 2 TBSP Apple cider vinegar (any vinegar works)
  • Pinch of sugar
  • Oil for frying

Instructions
 

  • Peel the plantains and place them into a pot to boil until tender. Make sure to salt the water with a very generous pinch of salt. Boil for about 20 minutes.
    boiled plantains
  • Meanwhile, Prep the sides
    Cut the halloumi into thick slices
    Slice the onions thinly
    prepare the camarones al ajillo and set them aside (see notes section for recipe)
  • Fry the halloumi on medium heat for about 3 minutes on each side until golden brown. Set aside.
  • Cook the prawns. Recipe in the notes section.
  • Fry the eggs to your liking. Sunny side-up would be the traditional way.
  • Add 2 TBSP of oil to the frying pan. Saute the onions until slightly translucent. Salt and add a pinch of sugar. Mix, then add the vinegar. Mix and let the vinegar evaporate a little bit. Set aside.

Mangu

  • When the plantains are tender, drain and add them to a bowl remembering to save some of the liquid. Mash the plantains immediately.
  • Slowly add the oat milk, and plantain water while continuing to mash the plantains. See notes.
  • Mash in the butter and a spoonful of the sweet vinegar onions.
  • Mash in ½ TBSP of cold water...AND DONE!!!
  • Serve the mangu with all of the fix-ins on the side. Add some sliced avocado if desired...AND ENJOY!!!

Notes

NOTES
  • Camarones al ajillo recipe
  • You MUST salt the water to boil the plantains properly. You can salt later if needed, but be sure to use fine salt. 
  • If you notice that bits of your plantains turn black. DONT WORRY! This is common, it just means part of the peel is still on, just remove it after they're boiled. This is also why the water turns purple/black. 
  • When making the mangu, slowly add both the oat milk and plantain water. This helps you reach the perfect consistency. If the plantains seem too watery, don't add all of the liquid. If they seem a bit dry, add a little more.
  • Mash the plantains to your liking. I prefer mine smooth, but with some lumps. Everyone has their own preference =)
  • Remember Mangú will harden as it cools. I tend to add just a tad more liquid than what it seems it should have to help with the hardening.
  • I also prefer to mash some of the vinegar onions into the mangú. This is a personal preference. I find that it gives the mangú extra flavor. However, feel free to add the onions on top, how it's traditionally done. 
  • When re-heating Mangú do so in a pan or the microwave. Add a bit of water 1 TBSP or so to soften it if needed. 
Keyword Dominican, pescatarian, plantain

 

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